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Opinion

If I’m a whore, tell me why

As a member of the student body, and of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority, I’m interested to know what new and challenging perspectives “W.B. Allen” thought she was bringing to the table when she wrote and published her article, “The Whor(ror)es of Rush” in the Dec. 3 issue of Drake’s DUiN magazine. I question this because, according to DUiN’s bylaws, that is what she was supposed to be doing.

“DUiN Magazine purports to serve as the independent magazine dedicated to publishing new and/or challenging perspectives on political-, social- and campus-oriented issues of concern to the Drake student body.”

In the only issue of the semester, DUiN presented readers with articles that chronicled a week of Hubbell dining, enlightened them on how to create a residence hall hot tub and presented the voice of Lady K. and her racial frustrations. The whole issue was intended to be satire of widespread concerns to the campus, and, while the article on how to achieve a “bro-gasm” brought laughter to my lips, it was the only one that made any relevant satirical argument.

After talking to DUiN’s editor-in-chief, Molly Bochanyin, I better understand and respect DUiN’s ultimate goal (to be funny) but this time the magazine fell short. DUiN isn’t bound to typical journalism norms like accuracy of reporting and fact-checking. With such free reign it should strive to be the most entertaining and outrageous it can be. Funded by student fees distributed by the Board of Student Communications, I’d like my money to be going to something that provides a reprieve from my daily news cycle. If you’re going to call out sororities (or fraternities) then do it well. Don’t call me a whore and forget to back it up.

“It can be assumed that sometimes sorority girls can be associated with whores,” Bochanyin said. “I’m not saying that any of our staff believe this, but I’m just saying that that was what the author was referring to.”

Well W.B. Allen, you know what happens when you assume. Instead, pinpoint the aspects of our daily lives that are so ridiculous to outsiders (trust me, there should be plenty) and make fun of them until we can’t help but laugh at ourselves. Narrate our Greek Street walks of shame, chant our recruitment songs back to us or try to find something in our wardrobe that doesn’t have letters on it — true stereotypes are the funniest, even to those of us who fulfill them. False information only serves to provoke the 27 percent of Drake University students who have pledged themselves to their respected and values-based organizations.


Photo courtesy of DUIN

I don’t live and breathe my sorority, I don’t make monetary donations, and I certainly don’t participate in hazing. I do pay dues for activities and events, similar to most non-Greek organizations on campus. I participate in secret ceremonies that are part of a private bond between sisters and I’m a part of something that you’re not. Being a sorority girl doesn’t make me a whore any more than it makes you look like the illustration included on DUiN’s Page 16, it just makes me different than you.

Is that a political-, social- or campus-oriented issue of concern? That I’m in a sorority? There are over 5,600 students enrolled at Drake University and each of them is different from the next, but they have common factors that link them together like class schedules, student-work jobs and campus organizations. My sorority links me in sisterly friendship to over 75 wonderful women and, while it’s a closer bond than I have with my fellow magazine majors or the guy that sits next to me in my Shakespeare reading class, I’m confused as to how that makes it a “campus issue.”

“Our job as DUiN magazine is to challenge the status quo and kind of say what others aren’t willing to say,” Bochanyin said. “That’s the point of DUiN magazine, to say ‘Hey, why don’t you think about this,’ and make others think.”

While girls on Greek Street might act a certain way, the status quo is nowhere near what was depicted by W.B. Allen in her account of recruitment, being a potential new member and her recruitment counselor. (Just to let you know, W.B. Allen, “rush,” “rushee” and “Rho Chi” are no longer terms used by Drake sororities anymore.) What she wrote wasn’t anything I hadn’t heard before, nor was she saying “what others aren’t willing to say.” “The Whor(ror)es of Rush” was a failed attempt to exaggerate stereotypes and while it might have been her opinion, W.B. Allen hasn’t provided readers with any solid evidence of sorority wrongdoings. A dress code is not required during recruitment, only suggested. You can’t be “assured a spot” by houses and your sorority friends could talk to you, they just couldn’t go out drinking at The Dublin with you.

This article won’t make me take a second look at joining a sorority, it won’t make me wear my letters less often and it won’t stop me from being an active member in the Greek community.What I hope it will do is force the DUiN staff to take a second look at the articles they publish and ask themselves, “Is this really funny enough?”

Collins is a sophomore magazine major and can be contacted at emma.collins@drake.edu

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7 Comments

  1. fellow Greek member December 9, 2010

    AMEN!

  2. another fellow greek member December 9, 2010

    Couldn’t be more true. People need to think before they publish.

  3. Archie Love December 9, 2010

    First off I loved that DUiN article. Mainly because you sorority girls getting all fired up about this opinion magazine shows how true the words are. And yes like most others you do live and breathe your sorority. The majority of the girls do. It’s flirting with being a cult which I find hilarious. Nothing says college experience and “sisterhood” like buying your friends because you lived such a pathetic anti-social life in your early years that you can’t possibly manage to make any friends in a normal realistic social situation. When in the holy name of God will you ever be placed in a professional situation where you have to line up like cattle for the slaughter house and be judged on how you act and dress to be accepted into a group or organization? Answer. Never. It is pathetic how you worship these “sacred” letters and rituals when I could easily go make/buy my own T-shirt and booty shorts with a couple of Greek symbols on them and fashion them in a way that resembled your “house”. Let’s be honest, every house on campus hazes and there is no doubt that you don’t either. There is not one house on campus that hasn’t broken some code or law in some way. Being a member of Greek Life I know it is true and so do you. So stop feeding everyone else your heaping piles of chunder.

    Good day to you madam and may you resist the temptation to drink the punch.

    I SAID GOOD DAY!

  4. Observer December 9, 2010

    I would like to point out that by writing this you have made more people read DUIN’s article, which is exactly what they wanted. You have chosen to attack satire, which is completely pointless because something cannot be proven wrong that is made up in the first place. Also, you seem to put down the author’s own experience during her rush period, and I would like to say shame on you. You should know as a journalist that everyone is entitled to their opinion, and in this authors opinion, her rush experience sucked. You can’t change that, and should stop trying. A better use of your writing would have been to inform readers that DUIN is satire and give positive examples of greek life, not attack it and make yourself look petty.

  5. Another Observer December 13, 2010

    You lost me at “secret ceremonies.”

    I do agree that DUIN’s aims fall COMPLETELY flat with almost everything they publish, and I wholeheartedly share your sentiment that I want my BSC money going to something of quality — which DUIN CERTAINLY IS NOT.

    But seriously? Like another commenter said — Being in a social sorority/fraternity is teaching you how to do three things: 1) Buy your friends, 2) Be exclusionary to others, and 3) Develop a sense of entitlement.

    How about you spend your college years getting to know a group of diverse, interesting people rather than purchasing a group of clones to be your “sisters?”

  6. Devonte West December 13, 2010

    “But seriously? Like another commenter said — Being in a social sorority/fraternity is teaching you how to do three things: 1) Buy your friends, 2) Be exclusionary to others, and 3) Develop a sense of entitlement.

    How about you spend your college years getting to know a group of diverse, interesting people rather than purchasing a group of clones to be your “sisters?””

    Exactly. But it’s preaching to the elf toy makers. They are all narrow-minded and wont see that.

  7. To first observer December 29, 2010

    This DUIN article WAS NOT satire in the least bit (unless you want to count the title of it). DUIN can do far better than attacking the same old thing time and time again.

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